Archive

Tag Archives: sculpture

Give me some polygons, nature and light: you will immediately catch my attention. I recently bumped into two different works which I would like to spend some words on.

AB DB0_02

Image taken from javierriera.es

The first one is the the project of a spanish artist, Javier Riera, who created spectacular perspectives projecting geometrical shapes on a natural landscape. The result is a suggestive painting, where light adds depth and volume to the natural canvas and geometry gives abstraction to the view. As the artist said in an interview, “geometry has the quality of representing the driving forces of nature that are not visible, the immaterial design of things, the origin of energy and matter”. The projection of scattered geometrical shapes into such context makes me feel out of place and wonder wether the view is real or not.

Cambodian Trees, by french artist Clement Briend, is the second project that drew my curiosity. The work is based on the digital projection of images from cambodian spirits and deities on big trees in different urban areas of Phnom Phen. The projections want to be a visual representation of the divine spirits that live in our world. They have a powerful impact that creates a sort of spiritual aura in the urban environment.

cam-3

Image taken from thisiscolossal.com

In both cases the projections create an effect which is halfway between sculpture and installation, and light, together with the natural element, gives the pictures an unusual depth, and a mesmerising effect to our minds.

Advertisements

In april 2011, the artists El Tono and Momo were invited to participate in the event Nova Rio Contemporary Culture, organized in Rio de Janeiro by Rojo. They worked together to create some colorful sculptures at the Parque Lage. They decided to create something ephemeral and realized a modular wooden sculpture that could change its shape in an almost infinite range of possibilities. They model 23 pieces of wood that would be combined in different shapes and compositions. Then, after a week of work over the structure, they colored each piece and placed the sculptures through the park, in the middle of the jungle and its local fauna.

With their simple but provoking colorful structures, the artworks of El Tono and Momo have a familiar look to my eyes: they remind me some of Calder’s installations and sculptures. The sparkle of vivacity created from their works in the park is bright and attracting, and, although being non-natural elements, it seems like they were born in the park itself, together with trees and flowers.

Images taken from www.eltono.com